Calculation and Evaluation in chess


Often during a chess game, you have so many different choices of moves in a position (especially, in a middlegame position) and each of them might seem reasonable. The important part is that we need to calculate the attacking possibilities very precisely.

Most players would spend about 20-30 minutes in the process of making a decision in that ‘critical position’ and unfortunately, that player would eventually play a bad move or make a terrible blunder. Have you been there?

Let’s take a look at a practical example.

data-size=”400″
data-fen=”2q2rk1/p2r4/b1p1Rp1p/8/1bPN1P2/2NQ4/P1P3PP/5RK1 w – – 0 24<” data-legend=”White to move”>

Black just played 23…Qc8 and it is White’s turn now. How would you evaluate this position? Well, White is two pawns up; one of them is doubled on the c-file, while Black has a Bishop pair for White’s Knight pair.

How would you play here as White? You may also record your calculations/variations for your convenience. Please, take a few minutes and consider this training as a serious one. After calculating all possible variations, continue reading.

The above position is from the game of our guest coach IM David Miedema. As I have already mentioned in the beginning of the article, he took a lot of time in this position, and ended up making a blunder. But what was your evaluation and calculations? I hope you did not make the same blunder. 🙂

You’re welcome to see what happened in the game and check your calculations by watching the video lesson below:

In this video, you’ll learn about:

  • How to arrange your minor pieces
    • Active squares
      • Controlling the centre
        • Easiness of your position
          • Method of elimination
            • And lots more.
            • IM David MiedemaAuthor information

              David Miedema is an International Master from the Netherlands. His biggest achievements include:

               

              –> 6th of the Netherlands, beating Anish Giri in the process, twice.

              –> Winning the Neckar open in 2010

               

              He gained crucial fun skills in teaching chess. He will be traveling around Europe making videos and live in nomad lifestyle.

               

               

               

              P.S. Did you correctly calculate the position above? Did you find this video instructive? What are your impressions on Miedema’s lesson? Feel free to comment below and discuss.

              Quick success in chess


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